Pupil Premium

Pupil premium and recovery premium strategy statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

 

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

Uckfield College

Number of pupils in school

1562

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

14.6%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021/2022 to 2024/2025

Date this statement was published

December 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

July 2021

Statement authorised by

Hugh Hennebry

Pupil premium lead

Hannah Butcher

Assistant Headteacher

Governor lead

Richard Thorley

 

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£191,715

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£27,239 - this is a provisional sum

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years 

£0

Total budget for this academic year

£220,954

 

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan


Statement of intent

At Uckfield College we believe that all of our students (including those with disadvantaged backgrounds or challenging home circumstances, children who have suffered trauma and those whose aspiration is impoverished) can be really successful and that developing highly effective learning habits is fundamental to this.

We believe that this means having high expectations of every PP student.

Our aim for every PP student is to become an Uckfield ACE:

A. Academic Achievement:

  • Critical, creative, hard thinkers and learners

  • Confident and knowledgeable speakers with large vocabularies (over 50,000 words) by the time they leave year 11

C. Global Citizenship and Character:

  • Social activists: engaged, responsible, knowledgeable, tolerant, outward-looking

  • Ready, willing and able to make a wholly positive contribution to improving society

E. Enterprise and confidence:

  • Personally developed and personally knowledgeable - physically, mentally, socially and emotionally

  • Able to think for themselves, be innovative, aspirational and to use their knowledge confidently

Good teaching is the most important lever schools have to improve outcomes for disadvantaged pupils. Using the Pupil Premium to improve teaching quality benefits all students and has a particularly positive effect on children eligible for the Pupil Premium. While the Pupil Premium is provided as a different grant from core funding, this financial split shouldn’t create an artificial separation from whole class teaching.

The causes and consequences of disadvantage are varied: Pupil Premium students are not a homogeneous group. Our approach will be responsive to common challenges and individual needs, rooted in robust diagnostic assessment, not assumptions about the impact of disadvantage. The approaches we have adopted complement each other to help pupils excel.

 

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Attendance

Our observations and understanding of our students indicate that absenteeism is negatively impacting disadvantaged students’ progress

Our attendance data over the last 3 years indicates that attendance among disadvantaged pupils has been between 4-10% lower than for non-disadvantaged pupils.

This gap has widened due to the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic

2

Behaviour 

Our observations and understanding of our students indicate that disadvantaged students are most likely to be suspended from school, most likely to display challenging behaviour and most likely to receive behaviour points. All of this impacts on disadvantaged students’ progress

In 2019-2020 59% of the total exclusion days were for Pupil Premium students. This reduced in 2020-2021 to 47%. This figure however, is still considerably higher than the percentage of Pupil Premium students at the College

3

Reading 

Our observation and understanding of our students indicate that disadvantaged students are most likely to have reading ages that are below their chronological reading age. This impacts on their ability to access the curriculum and impedes their progress in all subjects.

In any one year group currently as much as 73% of disadvantaged students have a reading age that is less than their chronological age. This is compared to as much as 54% of their non-disadvantaged peers

4

Key Stage 4 Outcomes 

Our observations and understanding of our students indicate that disadvantaged students are most likely to underperform at KS4.

Due to the Coronavirus students in 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 did not sit GCSE examinations and received teacher assessed grades instead.

However data from 2018/2019 shows;

A8 PP = 41.08 A8 Non PP = 52.0

P8 PP = - 0.45 P8 Non PP = 0.21

English and Maths 5+ PP = 21% Non PP = 54%


 

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Attendance

To achieve and sustain improved attendance for all pupils, particularly our disadvantaged pupils

By 2024/25 the attendance of our disadvantaged students will be in line with the national average attendance of all students.

Behaviour

To achieve and sustain improved behaviour for all pupils, particularly our disadvantaged pupils

By 2024/25 the overall number of suspensions of our disadvantaged students will be in line with the number of suspensions of all students.


 

Reading

Improved reading ages among disadvantaged pupils.

Reading age tests demonstrate a smaller disparity between the scores of disadvantaged pupils and their non-disadvantaged peers


 

Attainment at KS4

Improved attainment among disadvantaged pupils across the curriculum at the end of KS4

By the end of our current plan in 2024/25, 

A8 PP = 48.0 A8 Non PP = 59.0

English and Maths 5+ PP = 40% Non PP = 64%

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £ 110,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Small class sizes

Smaller class sizes allow teachers to have higher quality interactions with students and increased opportunities for feedback

Some research suggests the impact is greatest on reading ability (+2 months)

 

Small class sizes also lead to less disruption

 

EEF Small Class Sizes

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/reducing-class-size

 

Increased opportunities for feedback

EEF Feedback

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/feedback

2, 3, 4

Developing metacognition with the use of visualisers for modelling thought processes

Teachers can demonstrate effective use of metacognitive and self-regulatory strategies by modelling their own thought processes. For example, teachers might explain their thinking when interpreting a text or solving a mathematical task, alongside promoting and developing metacognitive talk related to lesson objectives 

 

EEF Meta cognition

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/metacognition-and-self-regulation

4

Uckfield Excellence

 

Evidence informed practice for teaching and learning

Uckfield Excellence is a series of research informed beliefs about how teaching and learning in delivered within Uckfield College

 

Each part of Uckfield College is supported by a plethora of research. The over approach is supported by What Makes Great Teaching, The Sutton Trust (2014)

1, 2, 3, 4

5 point reading strategy

Every teacher communicates their subject through academic language, and that reading, writing, speaking and listening are at the heart of knowing and doing in every subject

There is great value in every teacher teaching students to read and write effectively in their subjects.

 

EEF Improving literacy in Secondary Schools

 

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/guidance-reports/literacy-ks3-ks4

 

Thinking Reading - What Every Secondary Teacher Needs to Know about Reading, James and Dianne Murphy (2018)

Reading Reconsidered, Doug Lemov (2016)

Closing the Vocabulary Gap, Alex Quigley (2018)

3

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £ 50, 000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Homework Intervention

Targetted intervention with those who are identified as requiring homework support.

Homework intervention has three main areas

-Generic intervention (providing a space and an adult to support)

-Targeted subject intervention (providing space and a subject specialist to supportive

-SEND intervention

(providing a separate space for those with SEND that require a more nurturing approach)

Homework has a positive impact (+5 months) on secondary students.

However, not all students have a quiet, supportive environment to complete this important work

 

EEF Homework

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/homework

2, 4

Academic Intervention programme

 

A series of specific, targeted intervention for those who are underperforming in certain subjects

One-to-one intervention is seen as effective for students who are struggling in particular areas

EEF 1-2-1 Tuition

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/one-to-one-tuition

4

Reading Champion

 

Reading Champion is used to promote reading across the College 

 

Reading Champion also provides small group intervention to disadvantaged students to help comprehend text and address vocabulary gaps and develop a love of reading

Reading comprehension strategies can have a positive impact on students ability to understand a text, this is particularly the case when interventions are delivered over a shorter timespan (up to 10 weeks)

EEF Reading Comprehension Activities

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/reading-comprehension-strategies

3, 4

SEND literacy interventions

 

The SEND team deliver a range of literacy interventions including toe by toe and jump ahead (phonics programmes) and reading for impact (reading comprehension intervention)

Using a TA to run small group interventions has been shown to have up to 5+ months progress

EEF TA Intervention

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/teaching-assistant-interventions

 

Studies looking at the use of phonics in secondary school suggest that it can be helpful in students catching up with their peers

EEF Phonics

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/phonics

 

Reading comprehension strategies can have a positive impact on students ability to understand a text, this is particularly the case when interventions are delivered over a shorter timespan (up to 10 weeks)

EEF Reading Comprehension Activities

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/reading-comprehension-strategies


 

3, 4

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £ 60, 954

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Super Mentor

Employing a super mentor to increase the capacity of the pastoral team.

The super mentor, works 1-2-1 with disadvantaged students. 

Although evidence suggests that mentoring has little impact on academic outcomes it can help to target disadvantaged students with particular needs (low engagement, attendance, poor behaviour or aspiration)

EEF Mentoring

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/mentoring

1, 2

Peer Mentoring

Peer mentors are trained and then support those who have  sign-up up for a mentor

Although evidence suggests that mentoring has little impact on academic outcomes it can help to target disadvantaged students with particular needs (low engagement, attendance, poor behaviour or aspiration)

 

EEF Mentoring

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/mentoring

1, 2

Super-curricular

Arts participation has been shown to have a positive impact on the academic outcomes of a range of subjects (+4 months)

 EEF Arts Participation

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/arts-participation

 

Sports participation has been shown to have a positive impact on the academic outcomes of a range of subjects (+1 month)

EEF Physical Activity

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/physical-activity

4

Summer School (additional contribution on top of DfE funding)

Summer schools have been shown to have a positive impact on academic outcomes 

EEF Summer School

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/summer-schools

4

Attendance

Attendance staff salary contribution

1

Contingency fund for acute issues

Based on our experiences we have identified a need to set aside a small amount of funding to respond quickly to needs that have not yet been identified.

1, 2, 3, 4

 

Total budgeted cost: £220,954

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

Our targets for 2020/21 were that A8, P8 and grade 5+ in English and Maths would be in the top quartile of progress made by disadvantaged students at similar schools.

External exams were not taken in 2021 because of Covid-19. The outcomes of our Key Stage 4 teacher assessed grades are not permitted to be published. However, the A8, P8 and 5+ in English and Maths are all moving on a positive trajectory. Though the gap is continuing to be difficult to narrow.  

Targets in relation to attendance and extra-curricular activities were also impacted by the pandemic. The 2020/21 attendance was lower than in previous years due to the pandemic (All students = 88.9%, PP = 80.7%, nonPP = 90.3 %).

National attendance data is due to be released in March 2022.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/announcements/pupil-absence-in-schools-in-england-2020-to-2021

As evidenced in schools across the country, partial closure was most detrimental to our disadvantaged pupils, and they were not able to benefit from our pupil premium funded improvements to teaching and targeted interventions to the degree that we intended.

The impact was mitigated by our resolution to maintain a high quality curriculum, including during periods of partial closure. Our “live learning” offer during the pandemic, including all students being educated by their teachers via their 1-2-1 chromebooks was accessed by the vast majority of our disadvantaged students. Of those that did not attend online learning, the pastoral team made contact via email, telephone and with door-step visits.  The College was also “open” to all disadvantaged students once a week, for students to visit the reading room and collect reading books, other learning equipment and food if needed. During these visits the disadvantaged students could also gain pastoral and/or emotional support. Form mentors also had 1-2-1 phone conservations with their disadvantaged students weekly, to check in, encourage and support. 

 

Externally provided programmes 

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme

Provider

Bedrock Vocabulary 

Bedrock Learning

Accelerated Reader

Renaissance Learning 

My-On

Renaissance Learning 

Educake

Educake

MyMaths 

Oxford University Press

Kerboodle

Oxford University Press

Jamie’s Farm Lewes

Jamie’s Farm

 

Documents

Page Downloads Date  
UC_PP_Strategy_Statement_2020-21 31st Jan 2022 Download